Pence won’t invoke the twenty fifth modification because the Democrats try to indict Trump


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Pence will not invoke the 25th amendment as the Democrats attempt to indict Trump

Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday night he would not remove President Donald Trump from office shortly before the House passed a measure calling on him and the cabinet to invoke the 25th amendment.

The Democratic-held chamber approved a resolution calling on the executive branch to oust Trump from the White House after he helped spark last week’s deadly attack on the Capitol. The House approved the measure with 223 to 205 votes. One Republican backed it and no Democrats voted against it.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Had urged Pence to remove the president. She said if the vice president didn’t act, the house would vote on Wednesday to make Trump the first president ever to be charged twice. The house seemed far from safe to charge the president with high crimes and misdemeanors after his deputy refused to oust Trump himself.

“I don’t think such an approach is in the best interests of our nation or in line with our constitution,” Pence wrote of the 25th amendment in a letter to Pelosi. He didn’t mention Trump’s name.

Pence argued that using the procedure now would “set a terrible precedent” as the written amendment covers cases of incapacity or disability of the President. He wrote that “our government’s energies are directed towards ensuring an orderly transition” to the administration of President-elect Joe Biden.

While not specifically mentioning the impeachment surge, Pence urged Congress “to avoid measures that further divide and inflame the passions of the moment” as “we are preparing to have President-elect Joe Biden as the next President of the United States.” open”.

The 25th amendment passed by Parliament does not force Secretaries von Pence and Cabinet to act. House majority leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., Attempted unanimously on Monday to pass the resolution. Rep. Alex Mooney, RW.Va., blocked it.

The Democrats, who started impeachment proceedings against Trump on Monday, say they have enough votes to charge the president with high crimes and misdemeanors. At least five Republicans will join the Democrats to indict the president.

The legislature uprising that killed five people, including a Capitol police officer, sparked a rush to hold Trump accountable and there were only a few days left in his tenure. Proponents of his dismissal say it is too risky to keep the president in office until Biden’s inauguration on Jan. 20.

Some members of both parties have stated that they prefer to reprimand the president, partly because the Senate may not have enough time to remove Trump even if the House sends articles through the Capitol as soon as possible. But those who support the impeachment process argue that a token vote will not blame Trump for his role in the insurrection that threatened the lives of lawmakers and disrupted their count of Biden’s election victory – a formal move in the peaceful transfer of power.

Trump spoke publicly on Tuesday for the first time since the attack on the Capitol. He took no responsibility for the violence of the mobs and warned that a second impeachment could be dangerous for the country.

Speaking on a section of the border wall in Texas later that day, Trump vaguely threatened Biden while insisting that Pence and his cabinet not remove him from office.

“The 25th Amendment isn’t a risk to me, but it will come back to haunt Joe Biden and the Biden administration,” he said. “As the expression says, be careful what you wish for.”

The vote in the House of Representatives on Tuesday underscored the waves of tension that echoed through a shaken Capitol. Fortified borders greeted lawmakers outside the building, and inside they found more security guards and a metal detector on the way to the floor of the house. According to reporters at the Capitol, some Republicans in the house refused to go through the metal detector or have their pockets searched.

Democrats unveiled competing versions of impeachment articles on Monday. The one leaders titled “Incitement to Insurrection” seem most likely from Representatives Jamie Raskin, D-Md., David Cicilline, DR.I., and Ted Lieu, D-Calif.

In the article, lawmakers accuse Trump of launching an attack on an equal branch of government and disrupting the peaceful transfer of power. They cite not only his call for supporters to fight the election results at a rally shortly before the Capitol attack, but also his two-month-long lies that widespread fraud has cost him a second term.

The impeachment article refers to Trump’s call to pressure Georgian Foreign Minister Brad Raffensperger to find enough votes to undo Biden’s victory in the state. Some Senate Republicans have been pushing for the House to build articles only around Wednesday’s attack to make it harder for lawmakers to resolve impeachment issues, NBC News reported Monday.

In a further move that indicates the House will continue to weigh on Trump, Pelosi appointed impeachment managers Tuesday night. The legislature will argue the case of the Democrats versus the President in the Senate.

Raskin will act as lead manager. He is accompanied by Cicilline, Lieu, Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., Stacey Plaskett, the Democratic Delegate for the US Virgin Islands . Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., And Rep. Madeleine Dean, D-Pa.

Some Democrats have also questioned whether the House should send articles to the Senate immediately following the indictment against Trump. An early Senate negotiation could hamper Biden’s early agenda, including approving cabinet officials and passing a coronavirus aid package.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Has indicated that the Chamber may not receive articles until a week after Tuesday at the earliest. The Senate must initiate a lawsuit shortly after articles are forwarded by the House.

“If he does not resign and Vice President Pence and the Cabinet do not invoke the 25th Amendment, he will be indicted by the House of Representatives. And, as required by law, tried by the Senate,” New York Democrat Chuck Schumer told reporters in New York on Tuesday. He will become majority leader when elected Senators Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff of Georgia are sworn in later this month.

Schumer claimed that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Could call the Senate back for a speedy trial with emergency forces.

Hoyer signaled on Monday that he wants to send impeachment measures to the Senate immediately after the House’s actions. House spokeswoman Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., Didn’t respond Tuesday when asked when the House would send articles to the Senate.

“That’s not something I’m going to talk about now, as you can imagine. Take it step by step,” she told reporters at the Capitol.

On Monday, Biden envisioned the possibility that the Senate could spend half of its day on impeachment and the rest on filling the executive branch.


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